On trust

Some of my recent research has led me to engage more deeply with the notions of hospitality & ethics towards the Other. This work, combined with the hyper-affective state of the political climate, has subsequently led me to thoughts about trust; how our encounters with one another–in both public & private realms–hinge on trust.

When do we embody trust and what are the conditions of this embodiment? What does trust ask of us, and what happens when we fall short? Is the relationship of trust actually *always* one of short fall? What happens when trust is sieged, breaks, does not meet its promise? Does what follows equate wholly to distrust, or is something else also created?

Slowly, hesitatingly, I inch towards responses to these questions, knowing that when the articulations eventually come they will be incomplete and unsatisfactory. Tonight, however, this image allows me to see trust, albeit briefly, as simple and fullsome. Originally posted by The Good Win Way (Aamion and Daize) on their Instagram account, and then shared via professional surfer Carissa Moore, the image does something crucial for my thinking on trust. Namely, it reminds me that regardless of what trust claims to be or hopes to become–or, rather, what we wish it to be or hope it to achieve–every now and then it exists as real and true. And when it does, it is the most exhilarating feeling in the world.

TheGoodWinWay

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20 Historic Black and White Photos Colorized

My immediate response when viewing these colorized pictures was: “oh, no! That’s not at all right.” I wondered what the reasons were for my abrupt reaction. Was this initial response an objection to the particular colours used? Upon closer inspection I couldn’t say that it was. The hues and tones seemed fitting for each context. ‘Well, fitting enough,’ I thought, ‘because how would I know what the colour of the world looked like at this time?’ I realised then that my initial objection had nothing to do with aesthetic techniques and everything to do with the rupture in time that the manipulated photographs caused. In short: it offended my sensibility of time. The past—the “long ago past,” or what children endearingly refer to as “the olden days”—has always been represented in photography in black and white. Painting and written text have gone a long way to colour this era for us, but photographs assume a certain authority on ‘reality;’ an authority that, however false, has clearly fooled some part of my brain into categorizing a large portion of history as black and white, as colourless. These artists have messed with that categorization and ultimately provoked a question I am always interested in exploring, namely, is time and history static, or is it something moving, complex, and non-linear? Projects like this move us towards the latter position. They allow us to problematise grand narratives of time and history; to think about what is in the frame and what is left out; to interrogate how representations affect our understandings of the past and the present.

Needless to say, I like this project a lot 🙂

TwistedSifter

 

One of the greatest facets of reddit are the thriving subreddits, niche communities of people who share a passion for a specific topic. One of the Sifter’s personal favourites is r/ColorizedHistory. The major contributors are a mix of professional and amateur colorizers that bring historic photos to life through color. All of them are highly skilled digital artists that use a combination of historical reference material and a natural eye for colour.

When we see old photos in black and white, we sometimes forget that life back then was experienced in the same vibrant colours that surround us today. This gallery of talented artists helps us remember that 🙂

Below you will find a collection of some of the highest rated colorized images to date on r/ColorizedHistory.

I’ve also provide a list of some of the top contributors (in no particular order):

zuzahin aka Mads…

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